If all the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit, for whatever happens to the beasts also happens to the man.  All things are connected.  Whatever befalls the Earth befalls the sons of the Earth.     - Chief Seattle of the Suquamish Tribe, letter to President Franklin Pierce

Tetiaroa is a natural wonder of astonishing beauty and environmental, historical and cultural importance.  It is vital that this treasure be conserved, restored and protected so that its future is as rich as its past.

Tetiaroa Society is honoured to have been entrusted with the responsibility for developing a plan for managing and conserving this natural marvel.  Our vision for Tetiaroa, which has guided the development of the plan, has been that the health, diversity, and resources of the Tetiaroa terrestrial and marine ecosystems and the wildlife they support, and the island’s rich cultural heritage, be protected forever.

Tetiaroa Society has put together a Conservation and Sustainable Use Plan (ENFR) which involves all stakeholders and serves as a blueprint for conservation work on the island. 

 

Tetiaroa conservation program in action

Our conservation efforts encompass monitoring, preservation, and restoration programs related to the marine and terrestrial biodiversity of tropical islands, as well as the preservation of their cultural heritage.

preservation

egg

Protecting the young preserves the future.  Every egg counts.

monitoring

monitoring under the lagoon

Under the sea and on land, monitoring the environment is crucial to understanding and predicting changes.

restoration

marae

Restoring the archaeological history of Tetiaroa is giving us insights into how the 'tupuna' anchored their lives to the balance of nature.

Archaeological Mapping & Restoration Program

Tetiaroa occupies a very special place in Tahitian culture and history. Tetiaroa Society continues the inventory of archaeological sites on the atoll, started by Professor Sinoto, and provides the opportunity for field training programs in archaeological techniques.

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mapping the remains of a dance platform

Bird & Green Turtle Sanctuary

As an island with minimal human impact the atoll of Tetiaroa serves as a sanctuary for nesting seabirds and green sea turtles. Tetiaroa Society is working with local NGOs Te Mana o Te Moana, and Te Manu to monitor and protect these important breeding populations.

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Rimatuu village restoration

In the 1930s a small village was built on Motu Rimatuu to support the copra plantation on Tetiaroa. Copra (dried coconut) was an important crop in those days. The village was used until the 1960s when Marlon Brando bought the island and shifted operations to Motu Onetahi. Tetiaroa Society is restoring this historic village.

Old cookhouse on Rimatuu

Invasive species and biosecurity

Introduced rats are a major problem on Pacific islands. The rats thrive on coconuts but also eat seabird and turtle eggs and hatchlings, as well as invertebrates, and plants. Tetiaroa Society is working with invasive species specialists from around the world to rid the island of this serious pest.

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